July 2015

Help Yourself Get Active Again

Subscribers Only — When you have arthritis, your day may seem filled with the limiting thought “I can’t.” Your hips hurt, so you can’t bend over to tie your shoes. Your hands ache, keeping you from using your favorite garden tool. You’d rather not wear socks because you can’t bear the thought of putting them on.   More...

Not Sleeping? Natural Remedies May Help

It’s a vicious cycle, really: Arthritis sufferers need a full night’s rest to help reduce their pain and fatigue, but those very symptoms can disrupt sleep rhythms. If that wasn’t enough, research has shown that sleep deprivation can lower one’s threshold for pain, making existing discomfort feel even worse.   More...

A Safer Route to Pain Relief

Subscribers Only — It’s a battle cry those struggling with arthritis hear on a daily basis: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can ease your pain. But, if ibuprofen (Advil®, Motrin®) and naproxen (Aleve®, Naprosyn®) and other NSAIDs have offered little to no relief, you may think the next natural step is a prescription narcotic medication.   More...

Reinforce Your Ankle Strength

Subscribers Only — It’s been said that the ankles are the neglected stepchildren of body parts. Yet, a strong ankle is the linchpin to empower your daily activities. When arthritis settles into the bones at the base of your legs, the pain can keep you from taking the simplest of strolls.   More...

Finding Solutions to Sciatica

Chances are you’ve heard the term “sciatica” used broadly to describe low-back pain. In many cases, the term is a misnomer. Sciatica originates in the nerves and other structures of the lower back, but a number of other, non-spinal conditions can produce the buttock and leg pain that characterize sciatica.   More...

In The News: July 2015

Subscribers Only — New research suggests the popular analgesic acetaminophen shows no effect on low-back pain and offers mixed results in managing osteoarthritis (OA) pain. According to a study published in The BMJ (March 2015), the benefit of acetaminophen (Tylenol®) for reducing low-back pain intensity is only -0.5 points on a scale of 0 (pain-free) to 100 (worst pain). When looking at reducing pain intensity in hip or knee OA, acetaminophen fared somewhat better (-3.7 points), but the change was still not clinically significant. The study’s results differ from earlier meta-analyses, which demonstrated a clinically significant reduction in pain for hip or knee OA treated with acetaminophen. The drug is considered safe in doses up to 4,000 mg per day, but the current study found that patients taking acetaminophen are four times as likely to have abnormal liver tests. Currently, the manufacturer and many experts have lowered the maximum recommended dose to 3,000 mg daily.   More...

Ask The Doctors: July 2015

I’ve read that glucosamine and chondroitin can help my pain. Other times, I hear reports that they are not beneficial. What should I believe?   More...