November 2014

The Partial Knee Replacement Story

Subscribers Only — Unlike the total knee replacement arthroplasty commonly performed today, certain early experiences with knee replacement surgery were specifically designed as partial joint replacements to treat one segment of the knee joint.   More...

Ask The Doctors: November 2014

Q. I have struggled with asthma throughout most of my life. Now I’ve read that having the lung disease increases my risk of developing osteoporosis. Is this true?   More...

Complementing Pain Relief with Supplements

Subscribers Only — Overcoming pain is a daily challenge for those with arthritis, and one route many consider to alleviate the ache is by taking supplements. While research has shown that some may help and might even allow patients to take lower doses of prescription drugs, the fact is that supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Certain supplements do have value in controlling osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joint pain, but even though these are not prescribed drugs does not mean they are safe, according to Cleveland Clinic rheumatologist Linda Mileti, MD.   More...

Keeping Your Hands Nimble

Subscribers Only — Our hands are some of the hardest working parts of our body. Capable of a wide variety of functions, our hands perform extreme functions—from gentle and precise actions to heavy labor. Whether it’s daily activities, hobbies or outdoor activities, the power of our hands is often taken for granted until it’s lost.   More...

Update on Steroid Injections

Subscribers Only — It’s been over 65 years since the steroid cortisone, an anti-inflammatory drug, was first synthesized and hailed as a landmark treatment. Since then, corticosteroid injections have become the preferred treatment for overuse injuries of tendons and the deteriorating effects of osteoarthritis (OA) on the joints.   More...

Pain Reliever a Controlled Drug

Subscribers Only — Tramadol (Ultram®), the alternative, synthetic opioid pain reliever, has seen increasing use since it was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1994. However, a decision by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to list tramadol as a Schedule IV controlled substance (Aug. 2014) may mean changes for how the drug is prescribed.   More...

Understanding Your Knee Replacement Options

Subscribers Only — Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is known for many things. For those with the condition, pain and swelling of the knee joint and the decreased mobility it causes are the most common symptoms. And because of its degenerative nature, knee OA is also often directly associated with a total knee arthroplasty. While more than 600,000 knee replacements are performed each year in the United States, a less extensive surgical option may be more beneficial for some with knee OA.   More...

In the News: November 2014

A new low-dose formulation of the oral capsule diclofenac (Zorvolex®) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) pain (Aug. 25, 2014). The formulation consists of submicron particles that are 20 times smaller than in the conventional drug, which provides a greater surface area coverage and more rapid drug dissolution and absorption, according to the drug’s manufacturer, Iroko Pharmaceuticals. A phase III trial reviewed the efficacy and safety of diclofenac in 305 adults age 40 and older with radiologically evident OA of the hip or knee who routinely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or acetaminophen (Tylenol®). Taking 35 milligrams of diclofenac either twice or three times daily led to decreases in pain for both groups, researchers reported in Current Medical Research and Opinion (Aug. 2014).   More...