February 2017

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Subscribers Only — It seems logical that injecting HA into the joint should help relieve arthritis symptoms. But itís unclear whether the synthetic HA gets incorporated into cartilage. Evidence about the effectiveness of injections is mixed, which has resulted in some disagreement among medical specialty societies about the role of this therapy. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says the evidence does not currently support its use.   More...

Gout Attacks & Vitamin D Testing

Gout attacks can be very painful. The allopurinol may be causing a temporary increase in these attacks, but you should continue taking it anyway. Issues around vitamin D are the subject of debate in the medical community. An article claims that vitamin D deficiency is not a pandemic as is often claimed, and many people are getting tested for vitamin D and taking vitamin D supplements unnecessarily.   More...

Achy Joints? Try Tai Chi

Subscribers Only — Exercise builds muscle strength, which protects joints. And movement is needed to get synovial fluid, a substance that nourishes and lubricates joints, to circulate over the joint. But many people with arthritis are not physically active. They may avoid exercise because they believe it will be painful, they are afraid of damaging their joints or they fear falling. And not enough people with osteoarthritis see a physical therapist, who can develop a personalized exercise program according to your preferences and needs.   More...

Making Healthy Food Choices

If you have arthritis or hope to prevent it, does it matter what you eat? It probably does, and for a number of reasons. First, being overweight or obese increases your risk for osteoarthritis and can make symptoms worse if you have it. Aim to maintain your weight in the normal range through diet and exercise. What you eat may also help keep inflammation in check. There is a growing understanding about the role of inflammation in chronic diseases.   More...

Knee Osteoarthritis a Pain? Brace Yourself

Subscribers Only — When your knees are achy and stiff from osteoarthritis, you have more treatment options than you might realize. Along with pain relievers, injections and physical therapy, you can also try using a knee brace or foot insole. These assistive devices are helpful for some people with knee osteoarthritis. Knee braces are made from a combination of plastic, metal, foam and other materials. They reposition your knee to lighten the load on the damaged joint.   More...

Is Viscosupplementation Right for You?

Subscribers Only — Youíve had physical therapy and you exercise regularly. Youíve lost weight. You take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as ibuprofen. Perhaps youíve also had a corticosteroid injection. Yet pain in your knee from osteoarthritis continues to impair your ability to function the way you want. If this in any way describes you, viscosupplementation may be an option.   More...

In the News: February 2017

Ever since the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug rofecoxib was taken off the market in 2004 because of its link to heart disease, questions have been raised about other NSAIDs. The ancient Chinese practice of tai chi has become a popular form of exercise around the world. Medications for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be very effective, especially when treatment is started early. In addition to helping people lose weight, weight-loss surgery (called bariatric surgery) has been shown to have positive health effects, such as reversing or preventing diabetes.   More...

Ankle Arthritis: What You Can Do About It

For being relatively small joints, your ankles do a big job. They support your weight and absorb more force per square centimeter than any other joint. You might think this would make them especially susceptible to osteoarthritis, in which cartilage (the cushioning material between bones at joints) deteriorates over time. Yet osteoarthritis from normal activity is far less common in ankles than it is in hips and knees.   More...