October 2016

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Subscribers Only — Hip resurfacing is an alternative that preserves more bone and may allow for greater mobility. With hip resurfacing, the socket part of the implant is the same as in the total joint replacement. But instead of inserting the stem and ball device into the femur, the surgeon reshapes the bone at the head of the femur and places a metal cap over it. A larger ball is used than in total joint replacement, which should make the joint more stable and less likely to dislocate. The neck of the thighbone and part of the head are preserved, which may make revision surgery or total hip replacement easier if needed later on.   More...

Neck Pain and Hip Resurfacing

Neck pain is quite common. Nearly one in five people have neck pain lasting a day or more, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A pain in the neck can stem from several possible causes. You can wake up with a stiff neck from sleeping in a bad position or have long-lasting neck pain from poor posture. Hip resurfacing may be an option. It is generally recommended for people who are younger and want to maintain an active lifestyle.   More...

Demystifying Gout

Subscribers Only — Gout, once known as the “disease of kings” because of an association with royalty gorging on rich foods and alcohol, is widely misunderstood. A study published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research (May 2016) found that the media does not always help. The researchers found 114 newspaper articles on gout, 72 of which blamed certain foods and alcohol for causing gout. We asked Cleveland Clinic rheumatologist Brian Mandell, MD, PhD, to correct some common misperceptions about gout.   More...

Toe Deformities: What You Should Know

Subscribers Only — We often take our feet for granted, until something goes wrong. Maintaining the highest level of mobility and independence may depend, at least partly, on taking good care of your feet. If your toes start to bend and won’t straighten, don’t ignore it. The longer toes stay in an unnatural position, the more difficult it will be to correct. “Most people with toe deformities don’t need surgery,” says Georgeanne Botek, DPM, Head of Podiatry at Cleveland Clinic. “Some simple measures often work.”   More...

How to Avoid a Vitamin D Deficiency

Subscribers Only — Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which is necessary for healthy bones. In 2010, recognizing that the recommended dietary allowance of vitamin D—at the time 400 IU per day—was too low, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) raised it to 600 IU per day for people up to age 70 and 800 IU per day for people over age 70. According to Dr. Deal, some people need even more.   More...

Topical Pain Relief

When arthritis aches set in, are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) your go-to medicines? These pain-relieving drugs are the most popular treatment for arthritis pain, and for good reason—they work. Yet oral NSAIDs, which travel throughout the body, come with some potential side effects, such as ulcers that can cause bleeding. “Topical medicines, especially for hand and knee arthritis, are as effective in certain cases as oral medications,” says Jason Genin, DO, an orthopaedic sports medicine specialist at Cleveland Clinic.   More...

In the News: October 2016

Subscribers Only — Chronic low back pain is common and a leading cause of disability. Weight loss can potentially prevent the need for knee replacement surgery in people with knee osteoarthritis. Being overweight or obese is known to increase your chances for developing osteoarthritis and it makes symptoms even worse for people who already have it. A sudden knee injury can tear the meniscus, a C-shaped piece of cartilage between the thighbone and shinbone. Meniscal tears also may occur simply as a result of aging because the cartilage can become brittle over time (called degenerative meniscal tears).   More...

Gentle Yoga for Chronic Pain

When Judi Bar was 45 years old, she woke up one morning with debilitating back pain. Diagnosed with spinal stenosis (a degenerative back condition), she was told she had the back of an 85-year-old. “I had to walk with a cane and I kept falling,” says Bar. Her doctor predicted her condition would only worsen and she would need multiple surgeries. Bar wanted to avoid surgery and even stop taking pain medications. After five years of suffering with chronic pain, she started eating a healthier diet, worked to relieve stress and began a regular program of yoga.   More...