May 2016

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Subscribers Only — For people with osteoarthritis in the shoulder, the wearing down of cartilage at the joint over time causes pain and stiffness. If oral medications fail to adequately ease pain, the next step often is corticosteroid injections into the joint to reduce inflammation. These can help many people with shoulder arthritis. But over time, they can become less effective.   More...

Osteoarthritis and Bunions; Diet for Weight Loss

There are two common abnormalities that affect the big toe. One is hallux rigidus (osteoarthritis) and the other is hallux abducto valgus (more commonly called a bunion). An enormous weight-loss industry extols the virtues of various diets and programs, and promises to help you shed excess pounds and do it fast. So which ones can be trusted?   More...

Climbing Stairs for Arthritis Comfort

Subscribers Only — As an aerobic activity, climbing stairs boosts heart function. It also strengthens the muscles in the thighs, which decreases load and stress on the knee, a help for people with knee arthritis. Stair climbing also burns calories, which aids weight loss. Even mild weight loss can take significant pressure off knees. Every one pound of weight loss takes almost four pounds of pressure off your knee.   More...

Kitchen Aids for People with Hand Arthritis

Subscribers Only — If pain in your hands from arthritis makes daily tasks like preparing and eating a meal frustrating, don’t despair. There are techniques and gadgets to help you. Cleveland Clinic occupational therapist and certified hand therapist Jo Koludrovich, OT/L, CHT, has advice for maintaining daily function, including in the kitchen.   More...

Rheumatoid Arthritis Puts Bones at Risk

Subscribers Only — The bone-thinning disease osteoporosis is a concern for many women after age 50. But men can also develop osteoporosis, and there are other risk factors. For example, having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) increases risk, regardless of your age.   More...

Over-the-Counter Pain Medication: Use with Caution

Subscribers Only — When arthritis pain flares up, do you immediately reach for an over-the-counter (OTC) pain reliever? Millions of Americans rely on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs – Advil, Motrin, Aleve), aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol) to self-treat aches and pains. Although these medicines can ease achy joints, taking too much of them can be hard on the rest of your body.   More...

In the News: May 2016

People with painful knee osteoarthritis often take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). If these drugs fail to provide adequate relief, opioid drugs may be the next step. The bone-thinning disease osteoporosis may be more common in women, but men can get it too. Keeping bones strong is important for staving off this condition, and the earlier the better. Being overweight or obese is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis, especially in the knees. Low back pain is extremely common and can occur for many reasons. Regardless of the underlying cause, exercise to improve strength and support often is recommended.   More...

Shoulder Replacements Ease Pain and Improve Function

Hip and knee replacements are common surgeries for severe pain from osteoarthritis. But if your arthritic pain is in the shoulder, there’s a joint replacement option for you too. In fact, shoulder replacement surgery is on the rise, due in part to a newer replacement option.   More...