March 2019

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Subscribers Only — People who play sports, including basketball, soccer and tennis, can rupture the Achilles tendon from bursts of jumping or running. "The classic case is someone who plants his foot and then charges forward," says Dr. Berkowitz. The sudden movement can overstretch the tendon to the point that it tears. While this can happen to anyone, it most often occurs in men ages 30 to 50.   More...

Ask The Doctors: March 2019

At four months after surgery, it's not unusual to continue to have soreness in the knee that was operated on. This is a result of the increasing intensity of rehabilitation exercises, which put a tremendous amount of stress on muscles that have not been used for some time. Joint replacement surgery is the last step in treatment for arthritis. By the time a person has surgery, other treatments have failed to help and the condition usually has been going on for a long time. Pain and stiffness probably limited your mobility and your muscles became deconditioned. These muscles will be sore until you restore their tone. And that can take some time.   More...

Treating Shoulder Impingement

"As you raise your arm up, the tendons or bursa can get pinched between the humerus and the collar bone (clavicle) on top of the scapula," says Cleveland Clinic physical therapist Kelly Kinsey PT. If this happens continuously over time, you can develop impingement syndrome. If it goes on for too long, the tendons can start to fray and potentially tear.   More...

Wrist Surgery Options

Subscribers Only — Joint replacement seems appealing because it retains, and may even improve, range of motion in the wrist. "The problem is durability of the implant," says Dr. Shapiro. With wrist replacement, bones are removed and an implant composed of metal parts and a plastic spacer is inserted. These implants are not as predictably long-lasting as implants for other joints, such as hips and knees. And complications can be particularly challenging to treat.   More...

Nourishing Nuts and Seeds

Subscribers Only — Nuts and seeds contain primarily, but not solely, polyunsaturated fatty acids. There is usually a lot of linoleic acid, which the body converts to omega-6 fatty acids, and a very small amount of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is converted to omega-3 fatty acids. The opposite ratio is found in foods like green leafy vegetables, which are high in omega-3s. "We need these in balance for optimum nutrition," says Dr. Sukol.   More...

Is Arthritis Hereditary?

Subscribers Only — A laboratory test can detect the presence of the gene. "A positive test by itself is not diagnostic," says Dr. Syed. Not everyone with the gene gets AS and some people without the gene develop it. In addition, several other genes are involved. People who carry the gene and have a family member with AS are more likely to develop the disease than those with the gene and no family history.   More...

Don't Let Your Achilles Tendon Be Your Downfall

People who play sports, including basketball, soccer and tennis, can rupture the Achilles tendon from bursts of jumping or running. "The classic case is someone who plants his foot and then charges forward," says Dr. Berkowitz. The sudden movement can overstretch the tendon to the point that it tears. While this can happen to anyone, it most often occurs in men ages 30 to 50.   More...

In The News: March 2019

About 28 percent of adults age 65 and older fall each year. Falls in older adults can have serious consequences. A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine (December 2018) examined the effectiveness of the rhythmic movement exercise known as tai chi for fall prevention. For the study, 670 adults ages 70 and older who had fallen in the previous year or had impaired mobility were assigned to one of three groups. One group attended twice-weekly sessions of tai chi. The second group had a multimodal exercise (MME) program of balance, aerobics, strength and flexibility activities. The third group did stretching exercises. During the six months of the study, there were 152 falls in the tai chi group, 218 in the MME group and 363 in the stretching group. Falls were reduced by 31 percent with tai chi compared with a multimodal exercise program.   More...