August 2019

Download The Full August 2019 Issue PDF

Subscribers Only — Joint replacement surgery is often recommended when osteoarthritis seriously limits the ability to function and can no longer be effectively managed with nonsurgical methods, such as exercise, physical therapy, pain medications and injections.   More...

Robot-Assisted Joint Replacement

With robot-assisted joint replacement surgery, the surgeon can accommodate for each person's unique anatomy. "During knee replacement surgery, we place markers in the thigh bone and the shin bone and then we map out the ends of the bones," says Dr. Molloy. The computer detects the markers and overlays a map of the knee joint over a computed tomography (CT) image that was taken before the surgery. The surgeon can then very accurately position the components of the implant.   More...

In The News: August 2019

An estimated 54.4 million adults in the United States have doctor-diagnosed arthritis, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC analyzed data from the 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which is a telephone survey that included over 400,000 Americans. The study, published in MMWR (May 2019), found that about 23% of adults ages 18 and older have arthritis, with variation across the country, ranging from 15.7% in Washington, D.C. to 34.6% in West Virginia. Prevalence was generally highest in the Appalachian and Lower Mississippi Valley regions. Among adults with arthritis, about 31% reported severe joint pain and 34% said they were not physically active. People with severe joint pain were more likely to be physically inactive than those with moderate or no joint pain.   More...

Osteoporosis Drug Builds Bone

Subscribers Only — Evenity is different. The idea for it came from research on a group of people in South Africa with a rare disease that causes them to have extremely high bone density and bones that grow too much. They were found to have a gene mutation that blocks the production of a protein called sclerostin.   More...

High-Intensity Workout

Subscribers Only — For the knee osteoarthritis study, the participants doing HIIT started with a seven-minute warm-up, during which they slowly increased the cycling intensity. This was followed by a high-intensity burst, during which they cycled at a cadence up to 110 revolutions per minute (RPM) for 45 seconds. Then they slowed down to about 70 RPMs for 90 seconds. They switched between high intensity and lower intensity a total of five times before a six- to seven-minute cool-down of light to moderate pedaling.   More...

Brace Yourself Against Knee Osteoarthritis

Subscribers Only — "The goal with orthotics is to make sure your foot is moving in the best way it can so your knee isn't getting more force than it should," says Lorring. There are a wide variety of shoe inserts and heel wedges that you can buy in a drug store or online. You can also get them custom made or save some money and get semi-custom ones. Like with shoes, you need to get inserts and wedges that are specific to your needs.   More...

Who Treats Arthritis?

If the doctor suspects there might be some other cause of joint problems besides osteoarthritis, a rheumatologist will be consulted. If symptoms of osteoarthritis don't improve or get worse, your doctor may send you to an orthopaedist or a rheumatologist for more intense medical management or an orthopaedic surgeon for surgery.   More...

Ask The Doctors: August 2019

You should talk to your doctor to get an accurate diagnosis. If you know you have osteoporosis, be sure you are getting sufficient calcium (1,200 mg a day for women over age 50 and men over age 70 and 1,000 mg a day for men ages 51 to 70) and vitamin D (600 international units [IU] per day up to age 70 and 800 IU per day after age 70). A medication for low bone mass may be needed. Preventing osteoporosis from getting worse will help prevent further compression fractures. If you don't know whether you have osteoporosis and you haven't had a bone density test, see your doctor about getting one.   More...