September 2019

Download The Full September 2019 Issue PDF

Subscribers Only — Golf is an appealing sport for millions of Americans, including about 17 million people over age 50. Getting older doesn’t diminish the desire to play, but it can present some new challenges.   More...

Ask The Doctors: September 2019

If not enough uric acid is excreted (a function of the kidneys) it can build up in the bloodstream and cause hyperuricemia. Some people, but not all, who have hyperuricemia will develop gout. In people with gout, uric acid leaves the bloodstream and travels to joints. The deposits of uric acid can intermittently form needle-shaped crystals, which set off an inflammatory response by the body. The result is a red, hot and swollen joint of a gout attack.   More...

JAK Inhibitors for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Subscribers Only — Drugs for rheumatoid arthritis work by blocking parts of the immune system from wreaking havoc. Most people with rheumatoid arthritis start with the disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) methotrexate, usually taken as a pill (but is also available as an injection). It has a proven track record as an effective medication. There are other DMARDs as well. Methotrexate doesn't work well enough for everyone, and some people have side effects.   More...

Choose Healthy Snacks

Subscribers Only — To keep weight in check, healthy food choices matter. That includes all the food you eat. Your carefully planned diet can go astray with some unwise snacking. "I recommend a Mediterranean way of eating in general for both meals and snacks," says Cleveland Clinic dietitian Mira Ilic, RD, LD.   More...

Biceps Tendon Injury

There are two biceps tendons at the shoulder, called the long head and short head. "The long head of the tendon is deep in the shoulder, and it passes out of the shoulder joint into a little groove at the top of the humerus bone," explains Dr. Schickendantz. This lengthy pathway makes the long head of the biceps tendon more prone to injury than the short head.   More...

Can AI Fix Your Bad Back?

Subscribers Only — There also is a wealth of data in medical records and the research literature about the characteristics of individual patients and their experiences with different treatments. "When I'm in an exam room with a patient, it is difficult to reconcile the hundreds of data points in the records that influence how a patient will perceive their outcome and to render a truly informed decision for that patient," says Dr. Mroz. He believes the solution to this problem is artificial intelligence (AI).   More...

In The News: September 2019

Osteoarthritis develops when cartilage (the cushioning material that covers the ends of bones in joints) deteriorates. The reason this happens is not entirely understood, but several factors, including certain injuries, can increase the risk. A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (May 2019) examined the connection between knee injuries and osteoarthritis. The researchers reviewed results of 53 studies that included a total of about 1 million adults who had an injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), an injury of the meniscus or a combination of knee injuries. (The ACL is a ligament in the knee, and the meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage between the two bones at the knee.) The odds of developing knee osteoarthritis were more than four times higher following an ACL injury and more than six times higher after a meniscal injury or combination of injuries.   More...

Get Ready for Golf

"They can determine what parts of the body are problem areas before you play golf, and they will create an individualized conditioning program," says Dr. Burg, who is a certified TPI golf expert. Cleveland Clinic has several certified golf experts, and you can also find one in your area on the TPI website (mytpi.com). Golf assessments are not usually covered by health insurance unless you have a golf-related injury.   More...