Hip Osteoarthritis: Test Yourself

Over 54 million American adults suffer with arthritis. Most have osteoarthritis, and the hip joint is commonly affected. If you have hip osteoarthritis or think you might, take this quiz to find out how much you know about this condition. Cleveland Clinic orthopaedic surgeon Michael J. Star, MD, provides the answers.
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In The News: August 2017

Grating, cracking or popping sounds can emanate from joints (called crepitus). A study published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research (May 2017) found that people who hear these sounds in their knees may be at increased risk for developing knee osteoarthritis (OA). Osteoarthritis (OA) in the hip and knee are common, affecting about 45 and 25 percent of Americans, respectively. It is well known that obesity is linked to increased risk for developing osteoarthritis (OA) in weight-bearing joints, particularly the knee. But can losing weight prevent this?
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Strong Ankles Can Boost Balance, Prevent Injuries

Do your ankles feel less steady than when you were younger? Are you afraid of twisting or spraining an ankle or falling? Do you know that having an ankle injury can set you up for developing arthritis?
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Is Intermittent Fasting Right For You?

A better weight loss plan would take away the craving. Thats the potential of an intermittent fasting diet. Intermittent fasting does not mean completely going without food. This is not a starvation diet, says Kirkpatrick. The idea is to strategically time eating so you cycle through periods of normal eating and ingesting no or minimal calories.
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Download The Full August 2017 Issue PDF

While it might seem that restricting calories would make you very hungry, Kirkpatrick says that its the opposite. Hunger actually goes down. Your body adjusts and you are satisfied with smaller amounts of food. You see the chocolate chip cookie, but you dont have to have it. A patient of Kirkpatricks who just started a fasting plan noticed that she felt some hunger in the evening. She expected to be starving the next morning, but she actually had little appetite when she woke up.
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Dont Give up on Golf

Swinging a golf club can be hard on arthritic joints, including in the spine, hips, shoulders and hands. To ease the stress, plan ahead and do some stretches before playing and even during rest periods in the game (see Practical Suggestions box). Before teeing off, warm up by walking for five to 10 minutes. Then take several slow swings on the practice range. Start slowly and swing easily.
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The Challenge of Fibromyalgia

Even though no blood, imaging or other test can confirm a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, it is a real medical condition, afflicting about four million Americans. This chronic pain syndrome causes pain all over the body, fatigue, sleep problems and difficulty with memory and concentration.While there are
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In the News: June 2017

he prevalence of arthritis among adults in the United States is growing, according to new data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the monthly report Vital Signs (March 2017). Using data from the 2013 to 2015 National Health Interview Study, the CDC estimated that 54.4 million adults (about one in four) have doctor-diagnosed arthritis, including osteoarthritis (the most common type of arthritis) and others, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and fibromyalgia.
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Stop Worrying and Start Walking

Theres no doubt that movement helps joints. But pain, weakness and fear of falling may get in the way of being physically active. If that happens, consider getting some support-from a cane, walker or rollator. People with osteoarthritis, which is the wearing away of the cushioning material (cartilage) in joints, need to exercise. Movement helps to circulate synovial fluid across the joint, which provides much-needed lubrication and nutrition to the joint.
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Benefits of Bicycling

If you have osteoarthritis, it is important to stay physically active. It may hurt to move arthritic joints, but exercise will actually help ease that pain. Strengthening muscles helps stabilize and decrease pressure on joints. Exercise also boosts circulation of the lubricating fluid around joints. And it increases blood flow, which brings nutrients to the joint and removes waste products.
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Diabetes and Osteoarthritis Often Overlap

If you have diabetes, osteoarthritis (OA) or both, you are in good company. Many people have these health conditions, and they become even more common with age. Almost 26 percent of Americans age 65 and older have diabetes and close to 34 percent have OA (the wearing down of cartilage in joints). Not surprisingly, diabetes and OA often co-exist. Almost half of people with diabetes also have OA.
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5 Tips for Coping with Fatigue

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) causes pain, swelling and stiffness in joints. But RA can cause other symptoms as well, one of the most common of which is fatigue. Fatigue with RA differs from tiredness anyone can feel from time to time, for example after a bad night of sleep. Its a feeling of exhaustion all the time. It may interfere with your ability to go about normal daily activities and function effectively at work.
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