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Nutrition & Supplements

Easy Veggies

You hear this advice over and over: Eat more fruits and vegetables. They’re packed with nourishing vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Many have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and a vegetable-rich diet can help keep your weight under control. So, what’s the best way to get more of them into your diet? There’s no shortage of […]
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Choose Plant-Based Protein

Temporary disruptions in the food supply, especially red meat, may have forced some people to look for other protein sources. Cleveland Clinic dietitian Kristin Kirkpatrick, MS, RD sees this as a potential opportunity. “Some alternative proteins are better for us in the long run,” she says. Quality Protein “We need to get beyond the misconception […]
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Benefits of Whole Grains

The foundation of a nourishing diet is a variety of mostly plant-based foods. This includes vegetables and fruits, and also grains. Of course, grains means “whole” and not “refined” grains. The easiest grain to eat is wheat in the form of white flour. It is abundant in bread, pasta, crackers and many other products. To […]
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How to Identify Hidden Sugar

We all know we should cut back on sugar, and ideally stop eating foods with added sugars. Too much sugar contributes to a host of health problems, including obesity, diabetes and heart disease. It promotes inflammation, which is particularly problematic for people with arthritis. Sugar also appears to be addicting, making it hard to resist. […]
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Is There an Arthritis Diet?

Many people with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or other types of arthritis want to know whether there is a special anti-inflammatory diet that will help to relieve their symptoms. While numerous studies have examined this question, there’s still no definitive answer. However, there are some general guidelines. The lack of conclusive evidence relates to the inherent […]
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Ask the Doctors: Arthritis; Protein Requirements

Q: I broke my ankle about 15 years ago when I was 45. My doctor told me I might get arthritis later in life. Should I be concerned about this? A: Millions of Americans have osteoarthritis, and most of them have what is considered primary osteoarthritis, which doesn’t have an identifiable cause. It is also […]
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In The News: June 2019

People with osteoarthritis in the knee who add hip-strengthening exercises to their exercise regimen can walk more easily and may have less pain, according to a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (February 2019). The researchers pooled results from eight studies (with a total of 340 participants) that investigated the effect of adding hip exercises to exercises done to strengthen the muscles on the front of the thigh (the quadriceps). They found that combining the two types of exercises was significantly more effective than quadricep exercises alone for improving walking. The most effective types of hip exercises involved using weights or resistance bands. Adding hip exercises also resulted in greater improvements in pain, but this result was not significantly strong. Physical therapists can provide instruction on simple exercises to strengthen hips and knees.
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Risks of Keeping Cancer in Check

A few years ago, Cleveland Clinic rheumatologist Casandra Calabrese, DO, began seeing patients who were being treated for cancer and had developed the type of joint pain and swelling seen in rheumatoid arthritis. She isn't alone. Rheumatologists around the world are treating such patients. What is going on?
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Simplify Healthy Eating

Achy, stiff joints from osteoarthritis get more common as we age. Your genes also contribute to the likelihood that cartilage in joints will wear down. Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage, which covers the ends of bones, deteriorates, causing inflammation and structural changes in the joint. This can result in varying degrees of pain and reduced function. Weight-bearing joints, such as the knees and hips, are especially vulnerable.
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Healthy Holiday Eating Tips

Dining in a group causes most people to eat more calories than they would when eating alone. If you're planning to make a New Year's resolution about your diet, "don't wait for January; start now," advises Kirkpatrick. Here are more of her tips for this time of year:
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Take a Stand for Your Health

Standing is better than sitting because we have the benefits of motion, says Cleveland Clinic physical therapist Adam Kimberly, DPT. Your muscles are working when you stand. But you shouldnt stand all day either. Static positioning of any kind for long periods of time is not good. Variety is the key, he says.
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Ask The Doctors: July 2018

Like all drugs, bisphosphonates have possible side effects. These may include gastrointestinal problems, such as nausea, stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea and gas. Only a small percentage of people who take the drugs will have side effects. When they happen, its best to talk to your doctor rather than stop the medicine. Often, there is an alternative.
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