Nutrition & Supplements

Bone Density Tests and Fish Oil Supplements

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends a bone density test of the hip and spine for all women age 65 and older and all men age 70 and older. They also recommend testing for postmenopausal women under age 65 who have risk factors for osteoporosis. Fish oil is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, which the body needs but cannot manufacture. Omega-3 fatty acids are involved with brain function, growth and development. They also help reduce inflammation. Being deficient in these fats can lead to health problems, including heart disease.
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Is Viscosupplementation Right for You?

Youve had physical therapy and you exercise regularly. Youve lost weight. You take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as ibuprofen. Perhaps youve also had a corticosteroid injection. Yet pain in your knee from osteoarthritis continues to impair your ability to function the way you want. If this in any way describes you, viscosupplementation may be an option.
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Vitamin K; Plantar Fasciitis

Vitamin K is an essential nutrient for the body, playing a role in both blood clotting and healthy bones. It comes in two forms. Vitamin K1 (also called phylloquinone) is found in green leafy vegetables. Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of foot pain, especially near the heel. It is named after the structure thats affected.
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How to Avoid a Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which is necessary for healthy bones. In 2010, recognizing that the recommended dietary allowance of vitamin D-at the time 400 IU per day-was too low, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) raised it to 600 IU per day for people up to age 70 and 800 IU per day for people over age 70. According to Dr. Deal, some people need evenmore.
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Chinese Herbal Medicine

Some people with painful arthritis look to Eastern medicine for added relief. Chinese herbs, for example, offer the promise of a natural remedy for symptoms. They are natural and can be effective. They are also serious medicine and should be treated as such. Even though you can go online or to a store to buy Chinese herbs, including formulas touted for helping arthritis, you shouldnt.
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Calcium and Vitamin D; Balancing Exercises

Calcium and vitamin D are both essential for bone health. Current guidelines recommend that women age 51 and older and men age 71 and older need 1,200 mg of calcium a day, and men age 51 to 70 need 1,000 mg a day. Your body cannot make calcium. Ideally you should get calcium from the food you eat. Dairy products are the richest source. Youll get about 415 mg of calcium in 8 ounces of plain, low-fat yogurt, about 293 mg in 8 ounces of reduced-fat milk (2% milk fat) and about 307 mg in 1.5 ounces of cheddar cheese.
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Start the Day with a Healthy Breakfast

Everyone develops eating habits, and yours may be supporting a weight that is too high. To lose weight and keep it off, dont go on a specific diet, says Cleveland Clinic dietitian Margaret Zeller, RD, LD. Instead, be aware of your calorie intake and make changes to your eating habits that promote weight loss and good health.
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Enjoy Winters Superfoods for Pain Relief

Browsing through bins of fragrant fruits and vegetables at the farmers market on a hazy summer morning seems a million years away right now. As the winter months yawn on forever, the cold seeps into our bones, and yes, definitely our arthritic joints. Luckily, what Mother Nature takes away in warmer temps, she gives back with seasonal fruits, vegetables and other foods that pack a powerful anti-inflammatory kick. Cleveland Clinics Wellness Enterprise Medical Director, Roxanne B. Sukol, MD, explains why winter superfoods are helpful and how to incorporate them in your diet.
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In the News: January 2016

A new study shows that anti-resorptive therapy (drugs that prevent bone resorption or bone breakdown), including bisphosphonates, denosumab and others, can decrease the risk of subsequent fractures by 40 percent. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by frequent, but short, episodes of shallow (or even stopped) breathing when sleeping. In addition to the loud snoring OSA causes, it may contribute to high blood pressure and increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure and heart-rhythm abnormalities. Research continues to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of an organic path to ease arthritis aches, but new research underlines the importance of understanding that dietary supplements come with their own risks. Opioids, such as hydrocodone (Vicodin, Lortab), are often turned to for relieving arthritis pain. But, in addition to the increased risk of addiction-like dependence the drugs pose, a new study shows that taking opioids appears to raise the risk for serious infections among patients with rheumatoid arthritis
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In the News: December 2015

While research has shown that fish oil can help decrease joint tenderness and stiffness in rheumatoid arthritis patients, and may have a similar effect on osteoarthritis (OA), a new study suggests that taking more of the supplement doesnt boost its benefits. Its estimated that 42.1 million adults in the U.S. smoke cigarettes, and those who do increase their risk of requiring revision surgery of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following the initial procedure. Yoga is known to calm the mind, but now a study suggests that the ancient practice, combined with stretching, may be useful for easing the pain of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). The fatigue caused by either rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis (OA) can put you in a bad mood, but being more physically active can help turn your frown upside down.
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Processed Foods Cause Joint Inflammation

Processed foods get a lot of bad press-especially if you have arthritis. From French fries and hot dogs, to bacon and breakfast cereals, highly processed foods can fuel inflammation and, consequently, your joint pain, research suggests. While what constitutes a processed food seems clear, the reality is that processed foods arent just junk food and microwave meals. The term processed food applies to more foods than you think, says registered dietitian Lillian Craggs-Dino, DHA, RDN, with Cleveland Clinic Floridas Bariatric and Metabolic Institute.
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Ask the Doctors: December 2015

How does calcium in milk really prevent osteoporosis? A study suggests too much milk may actually INCREASE risk of bone fracture with age. For foot arthritis or osteoporosis, pain management options are many.
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